OpinionOPINION: Invisible illness a visible issue for many Canadians

Many Canadians with mental health problems are still without proper care.
ETC StaffNovember 15, 20181253 min

Justice A. T. McCormack
Op-ed Editor

Why does mental health continue to be so underappreciated in today’s society?

So much research and study have been conducted, proving that mental health is quickly becoming an epidemic.

According to a report by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), in one year alone, nearly seven million Canadians struggle with mental illnesses.

Mental health issues are quite unbiased and can easily affect any and every one.

Why does physical health still take precedence over mental health?

If someone has the flu, they aren’t typically told “to take a breather and shake it off,” or that “they are just being dramatic.” Yet, this is quite often the case with someone who suffers from anxiety, depression, or any other mental illness.

The mind and the body are not one and the same. As such, they cannot be treated the same.

It is common misconception mental health conditions like anxiety and depression can be cured with prescribed medication. However, this is merely a temporary solution for an ongoing problem.

As Canadians, we pride ourselves on having a free “universal” health care. But would universal not include the coverage of both physical and mental health care plans?

The amount of government-funded mental health care plans pales in comparison to the physical health care plans currently in place.

The CMHA reports that each year there are nearly two million Canadians whose mental health care needs aren’t being met.

As far as I am concerned, anything more than zero is far too many.

Everything is not what it seems. It may appear as though everything is okay when it truly is not.

The majority of people who struggle with mental health, suffer in silence, while the world around them completely unaware of the incessant battles they are fighting in their mind.

It is high time for their silence to be broken — and for this generation to change its view on mental health.

ETC Staff