NewsOPINION: Parade would be great for Andreescu but rally sends the message

Marlee GreigOctober 9, 20196 min

Pirasanth Gunasekaram, Sports Editor

It’s been the summer of championships in Canada. Bianca Andreescu brought gold and the Toronto Raptors brought the NBA championship trophy to the country.

Andreescu won the U.S. Open by defeating one of the greatest tennis players of all time, Serena Williams, is one of the all-time greatest Canadian sports moments.

Andreescu’s fans grew every time she advances to the next round. Once she won the finals, the whole country fell in love with her performance.

U.S. Open tennis champion Bianca Andreescu with a sign naming a street for Andreescu at the “She The North” celebration rally in Mississauga.(REUTERS/Moe Doiron)

The Raptors celebrated their championship with a parade, while Andreescu celebrated her win with a rally.

The rally was successful but, one wonders if should Bianca get a parade for her accomplishments instead. And just how would a parade work with Bianca?

What both the Raptors and Bianca Andreescu did was special but it doesn’t mean she should have a parade in Toronto or her hometown Mississauga to honour her. The rally Mississauga hosted for her was perfect.

The Raptors — a team of 15 players plus a host of coaches and support staff — needed five double checker buses, a number of cars, a marching band, a bus with sponsors, Drake and Raptors superfan Nav Bhatia, who was the parade marshal.

A parade wouldn’t have worked for Bianca because she couldn’t have a parade like the Raptors. Her parade would have been short because it would have just been a marching band, a bus with sponsors and herself with her family and friends.

Bianca’s fans wanted a parade. I get that, but it wouldn’t be feasible financially. A rally with her as the focal point at Mississauga’s Celebration Square is far better than Bianca potentially getting her moment taken away from her.

That almost happened at the Raptors parade. It went three hours longer than it was supposed to during a mid-June heatwave. And there was a shooting nearby that injured four people.

With the rally, it was all about her, not anything else that would have affected it negatively.

Even if she never had a championship rally, she still was honoured with a street named after her called Andreescu Way. She also has a day named after her.

She also accomplished a lot this year beside winning the U.S. Open. She won the Indian Wells Open in March and in August she became the first Canadian to win the Rogers Cup Canadian Open title since Faye Urban in 1969.

She is currently ranked sixth in the world where as she was ranked 152nd in the world.

The 19-year-old phenom also won both the female summer athlete of the year and the performance of the year at the 42nd Canadian Sport Awards.

Despite fan interest, the parade talk isn’t relevant anymore. She’s beyond that.